Scientists discover a new shrimp that kills with sound, name it after Pink Floyd.



<br>

Let’s imagine you are a shrimp researcher, and you come across this little guy:

Image from Sammy De Grave/Oxford University.

It’s a new species! Which means you get to name it!

So, what do you have in mind?

If you’re like this researcher at Oxford University, there’s only one moniker that’d fit.

“I have been listening to Floyd since The Wall was released in 1979, when I was 14 years old,” professor Sammy De Grave said in a press release. “This new species of pistol shrimp was the perfect opportunity to finally give a nod to my favourite band.”

In honor of the London band, the shrimp has been given the official moniker Synalpheus pinkfloydi.

In honor of the new discovery, Oxford University even commissioned custom artwork. Check out “Another Shrimp in the Wall.” Image from Kate Pocklington/Oxford University.

The name’s apt in more than one way. Just like its prog rock namesake, this little guy packs an incredible sonic punch.

Shrimp Floyd, which was discovered on the Pacific coast of Panama, is what’s known as a pistol shrimp. Though they’re usually only an inch or two long, they pack gigantic — and in this case, fluorescent pink — claws.

The neon-colored claw may have inspired the name, but it’s more than just decoration. The shrimp can actually cock it like a pistol. When it fires, well, you better get out of the way. The action launches a superheated, imploding bubble that can be as loud as 220 decibels.

A related species’ weapon in action. GIF from BBC Earth Unplugged/YouTube.

Even the original Pink Floyd would have trouble matching that kind of acoustic power. Your typical rock concert only reaches about 120 decibels.

The claw’s sound is so loud that anything nearby, such as a small fish, is in danger of being stunned or even killed, leaving a tasty snack for the tiny shrimp. In fact, the animals are so noisy that they can even hide the sound of military submarines.

Shrimp Floyd is here to prove that the rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle isn’t just for musicians.

Check out this reimagined take on Pink Floyd’s “Animals” album cover. Image from Chris Jarvis/Oxford University.

This little shrimp is a badass rocker acoustic monster. The Earth is full of superstar animals, and it’s cool that scientists made sure this one had a fitting name.

The new species was described in the scientific journal Zootaxa.

<br>



Source link

Pin It on Pinterest

Shares
Share This